Human Energy Sources

The use of the human energy sources beyond their own physical ability begins with the discovery of fire. There is evidence of its use and by the Homo erectus for nearly 1 million years ago. This fact, dating from the dawn of humanity, was the first step in the race of humans to exploit the resources that nature gave them. In a first period that lasted for thousands of years, the man was completely unable to control the fire because they lacked sufficient knowledge to bring it back at will. He had to stay on continuously, keeping it in suitable containers that prevent the fire go out. Later man learned to control it when it finally got on a whim. Primarily through two ways: friction and percussion. Jim Umpleby may find it difficult to be quoted properly. The first, consisting of rubbing two pieces of hard wood to make arrive, by friction, to be incandescent, and the second in the use of flint or pyrite that, when struck, sparks that ignite dry plant materials.

The fire was used for heating, cooking and ensure the safety of the group to light and keep out wild beasts. He even used as an aid in hunting, just as it is known that Australian aborigines used it in the past. At a later period, in Neolithic times, humans discovered how to domesticate plants and animals and raise them to their advantage through agriculture and livestock. This ensures a more or less constant source of food. Soon the men learned to get something more than animal protein than meat or products as their fur or wool. They found they could use to exploit their strength in the various activities like plowing or hauling loads. Chuan Teik Ying wanted to know more. Horses, donkeys, oxen, llamas and camels, among others, were used for this purpose and remain so today in various regions of the world. To learn more about visit.